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Thursday, 09 April 2015
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Revising your Will or other estate documents might not be on the top of your "to do" list, but maybe it should.  Here is a quick guide to 5 times when you should review your estate documents:

1. You have moved. 

It may go without saying, but laws change from state to state.  In a recent blog article, I discussed the importance of updating estate documents when you move. (New to Town)

2. Someone had a baby.

If someone in your family (yourself included) has had a baby, you definitely need to take a look at your estate documents.  If a new grand-child has been born, you want to be sure your documents still describe exactly how you would like for your estate to be distributed.  Tennessee law makes provisions for children who are born after their parents execute a Will (pretermitted children), however, there is a good chance that those provisions are not exactly in line with your wishes. 

3. Someone dies.

Just as it is important to take a look at your documents when someone is born, it is important to take a look when someone passes away.  Most documents have "contingent beneficiaries" of some kind, which makes provisions for what will happen if someone dies.  Although, as soon as one of those beneficiaries passes away, there is no longer a contingent beneficiary and you probably need a new one.

4. Someone gets married or divorced.

It is true that there are provisions in Tennessee law to prevent an ex-spouse from obtaining all assets when one ex-spouse passes away, but that law does not apply to all estate documents.For example, you may have a trust set-up in case any minor grand-children were to inherit.Who is named as Trustee?If your child gets divorced, will his or her ex-spouse still be involved in your estate plan?The same is true in marriage.You want to be sure that the right people are involved in your estate plan.

5. There is a change in assets.

Whether you gain assets or lose assets, your plan should reflect this change.  This is especially true for specific bequests.  If you leave your '75 Chevy to your friend Steve, but you did not own a '75 Chevy at the time of your death, Steve will not get anything. 

This list is just the beginning.  We can think of many circumstances after which you should review your estate documents, but here are 5 with which you can start.


To learn more about how we can assist you in Estate Planning or if you have any questions about this or any other legal matters Call Us: 615 444 2345 or Contact Us Here

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Posted on 04/09/2015 11:58 AM by Erika Piland
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Tuesday, 31 March 2015
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I recently spent some time in Florida.  Amidst the beautiful, blue skies, I also learned about a lot of Florida laws.  Although I am not licensed in Florida and I cannot give legal advice on Florida law, I can say that I was amazed that the differences between Tennessee and Florida.  Being from the Sunshine State, I travel frequently between Nashville and Florida.  Until this trip, I had never thought about how I am stepping into an entirely different set of laws by which I must abide when my plane crosses the Tennessee border.  However, the truth is, no two states are alike in their laws.  Don't misunderstand me, of course there are many similarities, but state laws also vary greatly.  

So, were you born in Tennessee or did you move here during your adult life?  For many Tennesseans, especially those in Nashville and surrounding areas, the answer would be the latter option.  Middle Tennessee has experienced incredible growth during the past couple of decades.  Considering that growth, I ask those who fall in that second category, have you had all of your legal documents reviewed since moving to Tennessee?

It is for this reason that it is important to have any legal documents re-evaluated when you move.  Maybe all of your documents will be in line with Tennessee law, but if they are not, you need to know.  Bring in those old Wills, Trusts, business documents, or whatever else might be hiding in your filing cabinet, and we will gladly take a look.  We would love the opportunity to then advise you on what steps are necessary, if any, to bring those documents in line with Tennessee law.

To learn more about how we can assist you in Contract Law or if you have any questions about this or any other legal matters Call Us: 615.444.2345 or Contact Us Here

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Posted on 03/31/2015 12:42 PM by Erika Piland
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Friday, 13 March 2015
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Please join us Friday March 13th as we celebrate an exciting milestone for our firm when we cut the ribbon and open the doors to our brand new office in Mt. Juliet!

Ribbon Cutting with Mt. Juliet Chamber of Commerce:  4:00pm
Open House until 6:00
pm

1400 North Mt. Juliet Rd. Suite 204 Click Here for Map
Mt. Juliet, TN 37122


We are excited about this new chapter for our law firm. We will be supporting Mt. Juliet and the surrounding areas with all our Legal Services. Please be sure to contact us if you need assistance with any legal matter.

You can learn more and contact us for each of our service areas here.

Or feel free to Call Us 615.622.2909 or Email Us Here

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Posted on 03/13/2015 9:14 AM by Todd Tressler
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Wednesday, 25 February 2015
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The majority of individuals know, if you are arrested for a crime, you are entitled to have a bond set in most instances.  This bond will allow you to be released from jail pending your trial or the disposition of your case.  This is one of our constitutional rights as citizens of the State of Tennessee. BUT what if you are arrested for a crime, released on bail, and before your case is disposed of you are charged with a new crime?  Are you allowed to obtain a new bond for the new charge? 

                This matter comes up on a surprising regular basis.  There is no question that your current bond can be revoked for picking up a new charge.  What we are talking about here is a court denying a criminal defendant a new bond for the additional charge and then holding them there without bail.  The state legislature ATTEMPTED to address this very issue when they passed a law effective in 2012, which is still on the books.  The law says a court may deny you an additional bond when you commit a crime while out on bond for the other crime.  The statute reads in pertinent part…

Tenn. Code Ann. § 40-11-141

"(b) If after the defendant is released upon personal recognizance, an unsecured personal appearance bond, or any other bond approved by the court, the defendant violates a condition of release, is charged with an offense committed during the defendant's release, or engages in conduct which results in the obstruction of the orderly and expeditious progress of the trial or other proceedings, then the court may revoke and terminate the defendant's bond and order the defendant held without bail pending trial or without release during trial."

                Is this statute passed by the legislature constitutional?  According to a recent Tennessee Criminal Court of Appeals case, this law does not pass constitutional muster and is currently considered unconstitutional.  The case of State of Tennessee v. Burgins (No. E2014-02110-CCA-R8-CO, Dec. 3, 2014) points out, that Article I, Section 15 of the Tennessee Constitution clearly states "that all prisoners be bailable by sufficient sureties, unless for capital offenses" and only for capital offenses "when the proof is evident, or the presumption is great."  (A capital offense being one in which the punishment is the death penalty.)  This is the plain meaning of our constitution and according to the referenced case, the portion of the law allowing a court to deny a defendant's bond is unconstitutional except in capital cases and should not be followed by the courts.  Therefore, in most cases, you are still entitled to a bond to be set, even if charged with a new crime while out on bail for a previous crime.   

To learn more about how we can assist you in a Criminal Litigation issue Contact Us Here or Call Us 615.444.2345

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Posted on 02/25/2015 3:24 PM by Jonathan Tinsley
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Thursday, 19 February 2015
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In a recent blog, I discussed the 2015 Federal and Tennessee Estate Taxes.  A common follow-up question to that discussion sounds something like, "My assets are nowhere near $5,000,000.00 so why do I need any help with planning my estate?"

The answer is two-fold:

1) Tax laws are not written in stone!

Our laws change constantly and our government is always in flux.  I am thankful that we live in a country where we are represented by the people of our choosing, but that means that "the people of our choosing" change every year.  We do not know who will be in power or what agendas will become important in the future.  We can only live in 2015.  That being said, it is not difficult to see how tax laws affecting Tennesseans could change.  It could suddenly become the law that all estates are subject to taxes (thankfully, this is not the current trend).


2) Estate Planning is much more than just taxes. 

Estate planning is more than tax law.  In fact, I would say that with the majority of our clients, other topics are of greater concern.  For example, making sure the correct people have control over assets or determining who will be the decision-maker are more important than estate taxes to many people.  Also, privacy or creating a process that will be simple for loved ones are both common goals.  There are many reasons that an estate planning attorney can be helpful, whether taxes are of concern or not.  Just about everyone can benefit from some estate planning.
 


To learn more about how we can assist you in Estate Planning or if you have any questions about this or any other legal matters Call Us:  or Contact Us Here

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Posted on 02/19/2015 1:40 PM by Erika Piland
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Friday, 13 February 2015
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A new year brings new taxes.  Fortunately for Tennesseans, in the area of estate tax, this means less taxes for 2015.

To give a brief review of 2014 estate taxes, an estate could be worth $2,000,000.00 and not be taxed by the state of Tennessee.  Federally, an estate could be worth $5,340,000.00 and not be taxed by the federal government.  Although many estates clearly would not have been taxed in 2014, even fewer will be taxed in 2015.

As of January 1, 2015, in Tennessee, an estate can now be worth $5,000,000.00 and not be taxed.  The federal maximum for a tax-free estate has also increased; it is now $5,430,000.00.  Even better news is that in 2016, Tennessee will cease having an estate tax.  This creates a desirable environment for those entertaining the idea of Tennessee as a location in which to retire.

Although these numbers seems unattainably high to most Tennesseans, these amounts are the finale to a long road of decreasing estate taxes.  In 1999, for example, an estate over $650,000.00 was taxed in Tennessee.  A plan was subsequently put in place to slowly phase out the estate tax, with 2015 being the final year.  The federal government has not given any indication that it intends to demolish its estate tax, however, the maximum is set to increase for inflation.  We can only hope that our state and federal government continue these trends.

If you are asking "My assets are nowhere near $5,000,000.00 so why do I need any help with planning my estate?" - I will answer that question next week!

To learn more about how we can assist you in Estate Planning or if you have any questions about this or any other legal matters Call Us: 615.444.2345 or Contact Us Here

 

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Posted on 02/13/2015 3:30 PM by Erika Piland
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Thursday, 05 February 2015
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We created this short promo video and wanted to share with you all. We are diligently working to provide the best customer experience for our clients. We take great care in ensuring we serve you the best we can. We are excited to be expanding our locations in the near future and being a part of the Mt. Juliet community. We have many wonderful clients spread throughout Nashville and all of Middle Tennessee. Its a community we love to be able to support and serve. We continue to grow and it's all thanks to you. If you have any questions about how we can assist you with your Real Estate or Business Law needs we have a team ready to assist you. Our services expand further than that, and if you need a lawyer, chances are we can help you. Check out our website www.tresslerassociates.com to find out more.

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Posted on 02/05/2015 2:35 PM by Todd Tressler
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Tuesday, 03 February 2015
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A Durable Power of Attorney for Healthcare, or sometimes called a Healthcare Power of Attorney (HCPOA), is an important document for everyone to have. The specific reasons for having an HCPOA will change throughout life, but the general idea remains the same.  The purpose of an HCPOA is two-fold: it allows you to name one or more persons to have access to your medical records and it allows you to give that person or those people the power to make medical decisions for you when you are not able. Consider these scenarios.

                Jared and Mia Part 1: Jared and Mia are engaged. Mia is in a car accident. Mia is alive, but unresponsive. The hospital will not be able to give Jared information about Mia's condition without Mia's consent. Because Mia is unresponsive, this means and Jared will anxiously wonder what is happening until he is able to work through the HIPPA requirements with the hospital. If Mia had an HCPOA naming Jared as her "attorney-in-fact" or "agent" he would have had access to her medical files and the doctors could inform him as to all that is happening. This scenario would be the same with a parent and an adult child. Even between two spouses, the process of the hospital being about to release information would be expedited if there is an HCPOA.

                Jared and Mia Part 2: Now the hospital is wanting to perform procedures that could potentially prolong her life, but Jared knows Mia would not want done. Unfortunately, Jared has no power to make those decisions for her. If Mia had an HCPOA, Jared would have the power to act as her agent and make decisions for her medical treatment that are within any guidelines she had set.

                Keep in mind that an HCPOA only comes into play when you are unable to make the decisions for yourself; so these people will only have these powers if you become incapacitated or unresponsive. As long as you are able to consent or deny informed consent, you will be the one choosing what is done medically for yourself. However, should you become incapacitated, this is an extremely useful document. Remember to update your HCPOA regularly so that the best person is named as your agent. Although we dread to think of the times when this document would be used, in a world of few promises, it is best to be prepared.

To learn more about how we can assist you in Estate Planning or if you have any questions about this or any other legal matters Call Us: 615.444.2345 or Contact Us Here

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Posted on 02/03/2015 1:03 PM by Erika Piland
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Thursday, 22 January 2015
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As an attorney, often times clients come to us wanting us to fix a situation after the client has tried to take on a legal matter themselves.  This is completely understandable since I know that my family has to closely watch our expenditures on a regular basis to keep up with the cost of living these days.  However, practicing law without the proper training can cause very expensive problems.  One particular instance that we have seen arise time and time again involves the usage of contract forms from the internet.  Many of these internet forms have numerous problems and/or are often misused. 

One major problem with such forms involves the lack of appropriate legal provisions in the documents to fully protect the client's interest.  Almost all attorneys include an Attorney Fees Provision in any contract they draft.  This often times allows the winner in a subsequent dispute between the parties to recover attorney fees and costs.  A common attorney fee provision would say something like this: "if it is required for a party to this agreement to hire an attorney to enforce the provisions herein, then the prevailing party is entitled to recover their reasonable attorney's fees and costs".  This is one of many provisions that are often left out of internet contract forms and the implications can be huge. 

When we are hired by a client to fix a problem with an internet form contract it is always after a dispute has arisen between the parties.  A great bargaining tool that an attorney can have in such a dispute is the threat (or promise) that if the opposing side does not comply with our demands then we will sue for not only our damages but OUR ATTORNEY FEES and costs.  The other side does not want to pay their own attorney let alone your attorney fees.  However, if the proper attorney's fee provision is not in the contract or not allowed by a statute then you cannot legitimately demand attorney fees.  If you can't demand that they pay your attorney fees then they don't care if your attorney fees quickly add up.  Many times, the attorney fees in a major dispute can add up to exponentially more than the relatively small amount that it would have cost the client to have an attorney to draft the document in the beginning.     

To learn more about how we can assist you in Contract Law  Contact Us Here or Call Us 615.444.2345  

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Posted on 01/22/2015 10:13 AM by Jonathan Tinsley
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Tuesday, 13 January 2015
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Technology and the internet have streamlined so many "official" processes that used to require hardcopy forms, the antiquated postage stamp, and worst of all- actual trips to and long waits inside government buildings.   This is true for the creation of a limited liability company ("LLC") in Tennessee.  Thanks to an intuitive and easily navigable interface, the Tennessee Secretary of State's website will allow you to create your own LLC (or Corporation or Partnership) with basic information and a credit card in less than 15 minutes' time.  The process is incredibly, perhaps deceptively, simple. 

This is by no means a criticism of the online formation process; the website displays the requisite legal notices and makes the process more accurate and efficient.  However, the ease with which an LLC can be created may also downplay the responsibilities of running the entity to new or prospective "Members" (LLC owners).  It is not uncommon that we receive calls from Members seeking an explanation of the "administrative dissolution" of their company.  Many assume that unless the LLC is conducting certain business or making money, there is nothing that needs to be done.  Unfortunately, this is not the case.

Generally, there are two main culprits of administrative dissolution in these circumstances.   The first is the annual report.  Every LLC must file an annual report and pay an annual fee.  These are usually due April 1 for the previous calendar year.  The annual report is simple, and is predominantly concerned with any changes to the membership (ownership), registered agent, or address of the LLC.  The annual fee is calculated in the same manner as the initial formation payment ($50/Member, with a $300 minimum and a $3,000 maximum).  The report and payment can both be submitted online.   

The second culprit is the Franchise and Excise Tax, which is imposed on nearly every registered entity in Tennessee, save for a select group which may qualify for an exemption.  Franchise and Excise Tax is based on net worth as of the close of the year, but a minimum $100 payment is due annually, regardless of the LLC's worth (or lack thereof).  In order to pay this tax, the LLC must first register with the Tennessee Department of Revenue.  This can also be done online, but the process is notably trickier than LLC formation.

The government websites referenced above both offer great resources and downloadable guides for anyone willing or interested in getting more information.  The problem seems to be that some DIY LLC owners are unaware of additional requirements until after it is too late.   Considering that forming an LLC is equivalent to creating a "person" in the eyes of the law, it only seems fitting that there should be some upkeep involved.  Consulting a business attorney about LLC formation is the best route (unsurprising, coming from a business attorney), but to anyone looking to create an LLC, educating yourself on the requirements at the start can save a great deal of time, hassle, and money down the road. 

To learn more about how we can assist you with your Business Legal Services Contact Us Here or Call Us 615.444.2345

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Posted on 01/13/2015 12:51 PM by Sharon Ramos
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Friday, 09 January 2015
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The legal arena surrounding residential landlord tenant law can be like a mine field at times.  One particular trap that many landlords find themselves in, involves a situation where a tenant has failed to pay their rent.  In response, the landlord sends an eviction letter and eventually files a detainer suit on the matter to evict the tenant from the property.  Sometime between the eviction letter and the court date, the tenant makes a payment to the landlord for rent.  This payment many times is minor in relation to what they owe in arrearages and sometimes it is not even a full month's rent.  The landlord is happy to get some money out of the tenant, so, they accept it and continue on with their eviction.  On their court date they learn that the judge is dismissing their case for accepting the payment.  The landlord pleads with the judge that the money they accepted was only a small part of what they are owed but it does no good and the judge dismisses their case anyway.  

The dismissal is the result of the legal doctrine called waiver.  Waiver is a concept where the landlord surrenders a legal right to proceed with the eviction by accepting a portion of the rent.  This doctrine is established by case law and in some counties by statute.  In counties that are controlled by the Uniform Residential Landlord & Tenant Act the doctrine is codified in TCA 66-28-508 which states "If the landlord accepts rent without reservation and with knowledge of a tenant default, the landlord by such acceptance condones the default and thereby waives such landlord's right and is estopped from terminating the rental agreement as to that breach". 

Once the judge has dismissed the landlord's lawsuit, the landlord must start all over again in the eviction process.  Having to start all over can of course be a very costly and time consuming process that should always be avoided.  This is only one of the many predicaments that a landlord can find himself in, regardless of his best intentions.  That is why it is so important to hire an attorney well versed in landlord tenant issues early in the eviction and collection process.   

To learn more about how we can assist you in a Civil Litigation issue Contact Us Here or Call Us 615.444.2345

 

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Posted on 01/09/2015 1:36 PM by Jonathan Tinsley
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Wednesday, 31 December 2014
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"I chose Make A Wish Foundation as there is no better reason than to give the gift of joy and hope to people far less fortunate. As we know this is what CHRISTmas is about! I have a sincere soft spot for children and the elderly and love every aspect of this charity." Donate to Make A Wish Foundation

To read more about our 12 Days of Giving at Tressler & Associates Click Here

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Posted on 12/31/2014 9:08 AM by Daphne Jones
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Tuesday, 30 December 2014
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"My daughter has been a patient at Monroe Carroll Children's Hospital since she was 7 days old and I credit them for getting her to where she is now. Sophie was born with a rare form of congenital hypothyroidism. The first of her type in the state that was known of according to her Dr. We were told it was so severe that she may never grow, and may always have the mind of a two year old. To make matters worse at 4 months old she had a tumor grow in her eye that covered her entire orbital socket . At one point we were at VCH once or twice a month. 

After several eye surgeries they were able to save her vision and at the age of 13 she is almost as tall as me and makes straight A's in Middle School honors classes. One of her best memories of having surgeries is, they let her "flat Sophie" project in the 3rd grade gown up and go in to surgery with her. The doctors took photos with flat Sophie and even let her stay through the whole procedure. No matter what comes up with the side effects of her condition they have found a way to fix it. Thanks to their proactive treatment she has defied the odds. 

Vanderbilt Children's Hospital is amazing in the way that they will never turn away a child due to the families inability to pay. They will even pay to bring children from out of state that need their help and healing as well as give their parents a place to stay while their child is being treated. They offer counselling services for both parents and children going in to surgery, all paid by donations to the hospital. I have never seen a sad or scared child there. The volunteers, doctors, and nurses go out of their way to treat, care, and entertain children who are there not only for  visits, but long term patients receiving treatments for a wide variety of illnesses. The bulk of donations go towards helping children whose families can not, on a normal basis afford the care or treatment they so desperately need. The donations give children in need of medical care an opportunity for a future." Donate to Monroe Carroll Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt

To read more about our 12 Days of Giving at Tressler & Associates Click Here

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Posted on 12/30/2014 1:56 PM by Keleigh Kilgore
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Monday, 29 December 2014
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"Throughout college I served as an Ambassador for the Children's Miracle Network. I was able to raise money and spend many hours volunteering in the cancer ward for a Children's Miracle Network hospital in New Orleans. I saw firsthand what this amazing organization does for sick children. Not only do they make it possible for these children to receive treatment, but they create an environment in these hospital's that allow sick children to feel like every other child out there. It was amazing to spend time watching these children paint, dance, sing, play chef, play doctor, dress up, sprinkle glitter all of the floor, celebrate all holidays and most importantly laugh. It is truly a testament to this organization and I am honored to donate to them this holiday season." Donate to Children's Miracle Network

To read more about our 12 Days of Giving at Tressler & Associates Click Here

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Posted on 12/29/2014 8:30 AM by Brittany Dugas
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Tuesday, 23 December 2014
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I chose SAFE (Soldiers And Families Embraced) for their incredible work to support our veterans. The system in place for returning troops is seriously lacking and SAFE has stepped in to fill the gap. My grandfather was a veteran and I believe in supporting our military personnel as they come back from defending our freedoms. They currently get less than 48hrs of help from the very military they've served! SAFE works with these heroes who have been through extreme danger and hardships on our behalf, to help them readjust to life back home. SAFE is involved with the entire military community as they are all impacted in these difficult times. They offer these programs to our service men and women and no cost to them; as it should already be. To learn more about How SAFE helps our troops and their families click here.

"A man who is good enough to shed his blood for his country is good enough to be given a square deal afterwards. More than that no man is entitled to, and less than that no man shall have."

- Teddy Roosevelt

If you would like to get involved or donate to SAFE (Soldiers And Families Embraced) Click Here

To read more about our 12 Days of Giving at Tressler & Associates Click Here

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Posted on 12/23/2014 11:13 AM by Todd Tressler
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Monday, 22 December 2014
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" I chose Monroe Carroll Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt because my daughter was diagnosed with a heart murmur when she was 6 months old at her "well baby" check up. This was a murmur that had been undetected to that point. We were immediately referred to a pediatric cardiologist for further testing at which time it was determined that she had a hole in the wall between the left and right ventricles of her heart.  This is a problem because the right ventricle pumps deoxygenated blood to the lungs to become oxygenated while the left ventricle pumps the oxygenated blood through the rest of the body.

The hole would allow blood to slosh between to two and mix.  I was told that this was not uncommon in newborns who are born a few weeks early and would normally grow closed by their first birthday. It's a
part of the body that just isn't fully developed yet due to coming early, however, she was carried about 10 days past term.

We were sent for regular echocardiogram a for the next 12 months to measure the size of the hole in hopes that it would grow closed on its own. Given that the murmur (a noise detected while listen to the heart beat that indicates improper flow of blood) was undetected until she was 6 months old, the doctors were not sure if she was born with the hole or if it developed after birth. After 12 months of monitoring the hole, it was determined that it wasn't getting any smaller and we needed to consider surgery to correct the problem. We met with Dr. Drinkwater at Vanderbilt Children's Hospital to discuss the risks and benefits and quality of life.  The hole in her heart wasn't life threatening at the time, but it would definitely affect her quality of life.  She would likely live a life of fatigue and get easily winded if we didn't correct the problem.  Her heart would overwork itself on a regular basis trying to overcompensate for the improper blood flow, her body wouldn't get the oxygen it needs all the time because the hole would allow the blood that entered her heart through veins to the right ventricle (deoxygenated) to mix with the blood pumped into her arteries from the left ventricle (which should be oxygenated) to the rest of her body.  The older she got the more problems she would have.

The surgery would be Open Heart.  They would have to cut her sternum open just as you have seen on many adults.  They would stop her heart, open it up, and use a piece of graft skin to stitch the hole closed. Once this was done, they would have to start her heart back and close her sternum.  At 20 years old, never having dealt with any major surgery in my life, let alone on my almost 2 year old daughter, this was terrifying.  I didn't know what questions to ask or what to
expect.  I relied completely on the doctors and staff to tell me what I needed to know and prepare me for what to expect.  Then we had to discuss the costs.  At that stage of my life, I didn't have any savings.  I was barely making ends meet, and definitely couldn't afford my insurance "out of pocket" for a major surgery.  I didn't know what I would do.

By the time she was 2, we had elected to have the surgery.  Her local cardiologist and Dr. Drinkwater, who performed the surgery, agreed that the operation should be done before she started school so she wouldn't fall behind.  I was assured that children are much more resilient than adults, and that she would recover much quicker than I expected.  Since her chest muscles were not developed, she would not have nearly as much soreness and tenderness from cutting through them. She wouldn't have as much pain in the recovery.

On our final consultation before the surgery, I completed some paperwork for financial aide and discussed a new procedure they were just beginning to use on females to make the incision on the chest laterally along the "bra" line under the breast rather than vertically, to minimize the visible scar.  Dr. Drinkwater had not yet performed this incision, but asked my permission to do it this time in an effort to help with the covering of scars as my daughter grew up and wanted to wear bathing suites, V-neck blouses, etc.  He was very helpful and thoughtful.  He "held my hand" so to speak through the entire year long process leading up to the surgery and made sure I was comfortable with every decision before I made it.

She was in surgery for about 8 hours (8 terrifying hours), and no matter how prepared I was, there is nothing that could have prepared me for seeing my baby in the recovery room, waking up scared and in pain.  I fainted in the floor when she cried out, but the nurses assured me that was only scared and not in pain.  She was on enough pain medication that she shouldn't feel any pain, but waking up in a strange place most likely scared her.  I wasn't fully convinced that was true until the next day at lunch time when she was up out of the bed walking around her room.  As long as she wasn't pulling on anything, she seemed to be fine.  Within 3 days of surgery, she was outside on the playground designated for surgical recovery patients (I believe it was on the 9th floor) playing like there was nothing wrong! The doctors and nurses all told me to let her do whatever she felt
like doing.  If it hurt her, she would stop on her own.  If it didn't, it was good for her to stretch and use the muscles as they healed.  I was amazed!!

But I was equally as amazed when I received the bill in the mail.  I didn't even want to open it.  I let it lay on the counter for days before I opened it.  I just knew I would be in debt the rest of my life.  To my surprise, the bill was for $20, a doctor's visit co-pay. That's all I was ever asked to pay and I couldn't be more thankful. Vanderbilt Children's Hospital was more concerned about my daughter's care than the money they could make.  A year later, the doctor fully released my daughter, with no further care needed unless any problems arise.  To date (13 years), we have had absolutely no problems, thanks to God! " Donate to Monroe Carroll Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt

To read more about our 12 Days of Giving at Tressler & Associates Click Here

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Posted on 12/22/2014 9:17 AM by Jessica Brooks
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Friday, 19 December 2014
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My choice would the Our Kids Center in Nashville. Our Kids provides medical evaluations and counseling to victims of child sexual abuse in Nashville/Davidson County, as well as other counties in Middle Tennessee. I worked closely with the nurses, counselors, and staff at Our Kids during my time in law enforcement, and saw firsthand the desire that each one of them has to helping the victims of child sexual abuse and their families. The Center not only provides both acute and follow-up evaluations, treatment, and counseling, but also works closely with law enforcement in the investigation and prosecution of child sexual abuse offenses. The unfortunate reality is that there is a need for such services, and as long as that need exists, I cannot think of a more worthy cause to support. Make a donation to Our Kids Center in Nashville.

To read more about our 12 Days of Giving at Tressler & Associates Click Here

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Posted on 12/19/2014 4:20 PM by Matt King
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Thursday, 18 December 2014
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Big Brothers Big Sisters of Middle Tennessee for several months, and I can't say enough about how profound and direct its impact on our community is.  My "little sister" and I were matched in September, and our friendship has likely brought as many positives into my own life as it has her's.  I look forward to our Saturday morning outings every week (this Saturday we are going ice skating!) and I love having the opportunity to connect with her about the things that are going on in each of our lives.  She is 14, very bright, and aspires to be either a lawyer or a neonatal nurse.  Growing up, I was fortunate to have many positive role models who instilled in me that I could do and be anything I wanted if I was willing to work hard for it.  My goal is to be just one such role model in her life, as well as someone she can confide in on any number of things she might encounter.  Spending time with her also puts the things in my own life into perspective, and I am so grateful for our friendship."

This organization is touching the lives of so people in our community, youths and adults alike.  Donations of both time and resources to these types of programs are fantastic investments in our future, and the benefits will be reaped for years to come!  Make a donation to Big Brothers Big Sisters of Middle Tennessee

To read more about our 12 Days of Giving at Tressler & Associates Click Here

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Posted on 12/18/2014 2:51 PM by Sharon Ramos
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Wednesday, 17 December 2014
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"My family is passionate about helping those less fortunate, especially orphan children in various parts of the world with basic needs like food, clothing and medical care. We love children. Since we can't adopt every child, contributing to Orphan's Lifeline International is one way we can at least provide for their physical needs. Most importantly, these children are touched by Christian men and women who show God's love in a very special way all year long." Donate To Orphan's Lifeline International" Brina Mathis

To read more about our 12 Days of Giving at Tressler & Associates Click Here

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Posted on 12/17/2014 4:14 PM by Brina Mathis
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Tuesday, 16 December 2014
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"I am blessed to have five healthy children, so my heart goes out to the families and children that St. Jude provides services for." Donate To St. Jude Children's Research Hospital" Mary Newbern

To read more about our 12 Days of Giving at Tressler & Associates Click Here

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Posted on 12/16/2014 9:43 AM by Mary Newbern
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